Zoe Kazan on Her Wildly Productive 2018: 2 Movies and a Baby

Zoe Kazan on Her Wildly Productive 2018: 2 Movies and a Baby
This article about Zoe Kazan first appeared in the Actors/Directors/Screenwriters issue of TheWrap’s Oscar magazine.

Zoe Kazan is not the only actor who also wrote a movie this year, but she’s probably the only one who wrote one film that’s in the awards race and then starred in a completely different film that’s also a contender.

And she’s definitely the only person who starred in one movie, wrote another and also had her first baby in the midst of her busy year.

But that is Zoe Kazan’s 2018. She co-wrote the quietly devastating family drama “Wildlife” with the film’s director and her partner, Paul Dano; the Richard Ford adaptation premiered at Sundance, went to Cannes and then opened in October. She played one of the lead roles in the Coen brothers’ darkly comic anthology Western “The Ballad of Buster Scruggs”, which premiered
See full article at The Wrap »

‘Never Look Away’ Director Credits Painter Gerhard Richter’s Struggles for Inspiring Film

  • The Wrap
‘Never Look Away’ Director Credits Painter Gerhard Richter’s Struggles for Inspiring Film
There’s a common adage that beautiful works of art — important art — can only come from a place of real suffering. It’s an adage that set writer-director Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck on the path to his newest film, “Never Look Away,” which is based on the life of German painter Gerhard Richter.

“My favorite book about filmmaking is Elia Kazan’s autobiography ‘A Life.’ He talks about his work with artistic geniuses and he says their artistic talent was the scab that formed on the wounds life had dealt them,” von Donnersmarck said during the question and answer portion of TheWrap’s screening series Wednesday night.

“That’s this very poetic phrase he used… and this film is about a genius painter and it’s a very beautiful analogy that you can stretch quite far, that if the wound is still open you can’t create art and once
See full article at The Wrap »

Rushes. Lost Ozu Restored, Barry Jenkins on "Beale Street," Ron Burgundy Returns

  • MUBI
Get in touch to send in cinephile news and discoveries. For daily updates follow us @NotebookMUBI.News Will Ferrell as Ron Burgundy / Yasujiro Ozu's Takkan KozoWe can hardly think of a better news story: a lost Yasujiro Ozu film entitled Takkan Kozo (or "A Straight Forward Boy") has been found and restored. We're also delighted to hear that Will Ferrell will be reprising his famed Ron Burgundy character in a new podcast entitled The Ron Burgundy Podcast. Back in 2014, we reviewed the most recent cinematic entry in the Anchorman universe. Recommended VIEWINGThe first trailer for László Nemes formally expressive and experimentative historical drama Sunset, which we caught at Venice earlier this year.A PSA to send your parents ahead of the holidays...I’m taking a quick break from filming to tell you the best way to watch Mission: Impossible Fallout (or any movie you love) at home. pic.twitter.
See full article at MUBI »

How many Greek directing gods have caught Oscar’s eye — and will ‘The Favourite’s’ helmer be next?

How many Greek directing gods have caught Oscar’s eye — and will ‘The Favourite’s’ helmer be next?
Among my predictions so far, two of the surest Oscar bets are that “The Favourite” and its director, Yorgos Lanthimos, will both make the ballot cut. Besides wooing the critics and earning an enviable 94% on Rotten Tomatoes, the bawdy art-house costume drama went from four venues to 34 this past weekend and has already grossed $1 million. Not bad on a budget of $15 million.

It doesn’t hurt that “The Favourite” ruled over the the British Independent Film Awards, winning a record 10 categories, including Best British Independent Film and Best Director.

Not since Stanley Kubrick or Alfred Hitchcock has a filmmaker exhibited such a rich vein of nasty black humor. Apparently, moviegoers are eager to witness the likes of Emma Stone and Rachel Weisz as 18th-century English cousins who viciously vie for the affections of Olivia Colman’s sickly Queen Anne. There is something quite satisfying about observing these ladies as they engage in naughty name-calling,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Martin Scorsese on ‘The Irishman’: Netflix Is ‘Taking Risks’

  • Variety
Martin Scorsese on ‘The Irishman’: Netflix Is ‘Taking Risks’
Martin Scorsese tackled a range of subjects during a discussion on stage at the Marrakech Intl. Film Festival Sunday, including the contribution to cinema of streamers like Netflix, the backers of his latest movie, “The Irishman,” starring Robert De Niro and Al Pacino.

Scorsese is viewed as one of the godfathers of the Marrakech Film Festival, having attended on three previous occasions, including as jury president in 2013. During the fest’s 17th edition, he hosted the career tribute to De Niro on Saturday evening and on Sunday participated in a conversation with Moroccan helmers Laila Marrakchi (“Rock the Casbah”) and Faouzi Bensaidi (“Volubilis”).

As Bensaidi mentioned at the start of the conversation, Scorsese has been a direct inspiration for many Moroccan filmmakers, because of the way that his characters and stories resonate with Moroccans.

Scorsese said that he still watches many films, but now mainly at home, saying that he misses the audience experience.
See full article at Variety »

Vivien Leigh movies: 10 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Gone with the Wind,’ ‘A Streetcar Named Desire’

  • Gold Derby
Vivien Leigh movies: 10 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Gone with the Wind,’ ‘A Streetcar Named Desire’
Vivien Leigh would’ve celebrated her 105th birthday on November 5, 2018. The two-time Oscar inner made only a handful of films before her untimely death in 1967 at the age of 53. Yet several of those titles remain classics. In honor of her birthday, let’s take a look back at 10 of her greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in British India, Leigh appeared in a number of roles on both the stage and screen in England, including a production of “Hamlet” opposite her husband, Laurence Olivier.

She came to international attention after landing the coveted role of Scarlet O’Hara in David O. Selznick’s massive adaptation of Margaret Mitchell‘s bestseller “Gone with the Wind” (1939). Leigh was far from the first choice to embody the headstrong Southern belle who pines after a married man (Leslie Howard) while wedding another (Clark Gable) against the backdrop of the Civil War. Yet the
See full article at Gold Derby »

Vivien Leigh movies: 10 greatest films ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Vivien Leigh movies: 10 greatest films ranked worst to best
Vivien Leigh would’ve celebrated her 105th birthday on November 5, 2018. The two-time Oscar inner made only a handful of films before her untimely death in 1967 at the age of 53. Yet several of those titles remain classics. In honor of her birthday, let’s take a look back at 10 of her greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in British India, Leigh appeared in a number of roles on both the stage and screen in England, including a production of “Hamlet” opposite her husband, Laurence Olivier.

She came to international attention after landing the coveted role of Scarlet O’Hara in David O. Selznick’s massive adaptation of Margaret Mitchell‘s bestseller “Gone with the Wind” (1939). Leigh was far from the first choice to embody the headstrong Southern belle who pines after a married man (Leslie Howard) while wedding another (Clark Gable) against the backdrop of the Civil War. Yet the
See full article at Gold Derby »

If You Hate-Follow Dennis Miller on Twitter, You’ll Hate-Love His New Stand-Up Special

  • The Wrap
Dennis Miller hopes you watch his new stand-up special. But if his Twitter feed is any indication, he knows a good number will do so just because of how much they hate him.

“It is odd, this function of social media that you learn that some people hate-follow you in an odd way. So some people might watch from that perspective,” Miller told TheWrap. “I can’t govern it once I’ve written it and said it. But I do know that if I put a tweet out, it seems like the first five people — you can see a couple of the comments under the tweet right away — are someone who hates your guts, like there’s a fire station and they’re right next to the pole waiting to get their boots on.”

Miller, the conservative comedian and former host of “Weekend Update,” of course gives those on the
See full article at The Wrap »

Montgomery Clift movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘A Place in the Sun,’ ‘From Here to Eternity’

  • Gold Derby
Montgomery Clift movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘A Place in the Sun,’ ‘From Here to Eternity’
Montgomery Clift would’ve celebrated his 98th birthday on October 17, 2018. The iconic actor gave only a small number of onscreen performances before his untimely death in 1966 at the age of 45. Yet several of those titles remain classics. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 12 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

A product of the Actor’s Studio, where he studied under Lee Strasberg and Elia Kazan, Clift had a successful Broadway career before moving to Hollywood. Among his notable stage credits was the role of Henry in Thornton Wilder’s Pulitzer Prize-winning “The Skin of Our Teeth.” Like James Dean and Marlon Brando, he was one of the original method actors, calling upon past memories and experiences to inform his performances.

He came to the attention of movie audiences in 1948 with a pair of releases: Howard Hawks‘ western “Red River” and Fred Zinnemann‘s WWII drama “The Search.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Montgomery Clift movies: 12 greatest films ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Montgomery Clift movies: 12 greatest films ranked worst to best
Montgomery Clift would’ve celebrated his 98th birthday on October 17, 2018. The iconic actor gave only a small number of onscreen performances before his untimely death in 1966 at the age of 45. Yet several of those titles remain classics. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 12 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

A product of the Actor’s Studio, where he studied under Lee Strasberg and Elia Kazan, Clift had a successful Broadway career before moving to Hollywood. Among his notable stage credits was the role of Henry in Thornton Wilder’s Pulitzer Prize-winning “The Skin of Our Teeth.” Like James Dean and Marlon Brando, he was one of the original method actors, calling upon past memories and experiences to inform his performances.

He came to the attention of movie audiences in 1948 with a pair of releases: Howard Hawks‘ western “Red River” and Fred Zinnemann‘s WWII drama “The Search.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oscar Flashback: The 11 films that scored two of the Big Five, including ‘The Philadelphia Story,’ ‘La La Land’

Oscar Flashback: The 11 films that scored two of the Big Five, including ‘The Philadelphia Story,’ ‘La La Land’
This article marks Part 3 of the Gold Derby series reflecting on films that contended for the Big Five Oscars – Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Actress and Best Screenplay (Original or Adapted). With “A Star Is Born” this year on the cusp of joining this exclusive group of Oscar favorites, join us as we look back at the 43 extraordinary pictures that earned Academy Awards nominations in each of the Big Five categories, including the following 11 films that scored a pair of prizes among the top races.

At the 4th Academy Awards ceremony, “Cimarron” (1931) made Oscar history as the first motion picture to ever score nominations in the Big Five categories. On the big night, the western took home the top prize in Best Picture, as well as the Oscar in Best Adapted Screenplay (Howard Estabrook). Not as successful were the picture’s director, Wesley Ruggles, topped by Norman Taurog (“Skippy”), and the leads,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oscar Flashback: The 11 films that won one of the Big Five, including ‘Sunset Boulevard,’ ‘Chinatown’

Oscar Flashback: The 11 films that won one of the Big Five, including ‘Sunset Boulevard,’ ‘Chinatown’
This article marks Part 2 of the Gold Derby series reflecting on films that contended for the Big Five Oscars – Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Actress and Best Screenplay (Original or Adapted). With “A Star Is Born” this year on the cusp of joining this exclusive group of Oscar favorites, join us as we look back at the 43 extraordinary pictures that earned Academy Awards nominations in each of the Big Five categories, including the following 11 films that scored a single prize among the top races.

More than eight decades prior to Bradley Cooper’s take on the timeless tale, the first “A Star Is Born” (1937), headlined by Fredric March and Janet Gaynor, became the third motion picture, following “Cimarron” (1931) and “It Happened One Night” (1934), to earn nominations in the Big Five Oscar categories.

At the 10th Academy Awards ceremony, however, neither March nor Gaynor emerged triumphant, losing in their
See full article at Gold Derby »

Where Are They Now: Albert Brenner Went From Window Dressing to Oscar Noms

  • Variety
Growing up among his native Brooklyn’s brick-and-fire-escape facades in the 1930’s, production designer-to-be Albert Brenner often dreamed of the wide open spaces depicted in his favorite Saturday-matinee Westerns. At 16, he landed his first “art job”: dressing windows for a New York City department store.

Two years later, Brenner swapped mannequins for military service and flew in B-24 bombers until World War II ended in 1945. On the G.I. Bill, he attended Yale University, graduating with skills in drafting, and went into summer stock theater under designer Samuel Leve, toiling away on plays like “The Fifth Season” and gaining a union card in the process.

He developed his designer chops in New York on TV shows like “The Phil Silvers Show,” “Car 54, Where Are You?” “Captain Kangaroo” and “Playhouse 90.” His first day on the Silvers show, where he eventually earned $250 a week, was nearly his last, when he
See full article at Variety »

Virginia Robinson Dead at 99

Virginia Robinson in Broad CityVirginia Robinson died peacefully in her home in New York City on June 8. She was 99.

Robinson was a New York City resident for over sixty years and a working actress from ages 19 to 98. She was born Virginia Routh on March 27, 1919, in Newark, New Jersey. She trained in London, and was acting and modeling professionally by the age of 19.

During World War II, Robinson was a member of the Uso, entertaining troops in Africa and Italy. After the war she worked for the Dupont Radio Hour, and began a serious acting career.

She performed in fifteen Broadway plays, working with such directors as Elia Kazan, Franco Zefferelli, John Gielgud and George S. Kaufman. She was a standby for Vivien Leigh in "Duel of Angels." She also worked Off-Broadway and in Regional Theatre.

She appeared in numerous films, including Diary of a Mad Housewife, and spent many years in daytime drama,
See full article at We Love Soaps »

Bruce Dern on ‘White Boy Rick,’ the Secret of Acting and Trying Always to Be Fair

  • Variety
Bruce Dern on ‘White Boy Rick,’ the Secret of Acting and Trying Always to Be Fair
Bruce Dern is celebrating 60 years as an actor, having made his Broadway debut in the 1958 “Shadow of a Gunman” while studying with Lee Strasberg and Elia Kazan. This year, his film work includes playing two real-life characters: Joseph Kennedy in “Chappaquiddick” and Roman Wershe in Studio 8’s “White Boy Rick.” The latter film, about a 14-year-old who was arrested in 1980s Detroit, opens Sept. 14.

What drew you to “White Boy Rick”?

It’s real. I play the grandfather of the young boy, Rick Wershe Jr. He had to take a package across town and police busted him. He was just released this year after 29 years. He was 14 [when he was imprisoned], so to lighten his sentence, they made him an informer. Wershe was in the wrong place at the wrong time. The movie shows that “It ain’t fair.” My whole life is about trying to be fair. My aunt married Herbert F.
See full article at Variety »

Elia Kazan movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘A Streetcar Named Desire,’ ‘On the Waterfront’

  • Gold Derby
Elia Kazan movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘A Streetcar Named Desire,’ ‘On the Waterfront’
Elia Kazan would have celebrated his 109th birthday on September 7, 2018. Years after his death in 2003, the two-time Oscar-winning director remains both an influential and controversial figure, respected and reviled in equal measure. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 15 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Kazan started his career as a stage actor, soon transitioning into directing. He mounted several landmark productions, including the original run of “A Streetcar Named Desire.” Throughout his career he received three Tony awards for Best Director of a Play: “All My Sons” in 1947, “Death of a Salesman” in 1949, and “J.B.” in 1959.

He transitioned into filmmaking with “A Tree Grows in Brooklyn” (1945). Two years later, he won his first Oscar for Best Director for “Gentleman’s Agreement” (1947), which also took home Best Picture and Best Supporting Actress (Celeste Holm). A taboo-shattering drama about antisemitism, the film established
See full article at Gold Derby »

Elia Kazan movies: 15 greatest films ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Elia Kazan movies: 15 greatest films ranked worst to best
Elia Kazan would have celebrated his 109th birthday on September 7, 2018. Years after his death in 2003, the two-time Oscar-winning director remains both an influential and controversial figure, respected and reviled in equal measure. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 15 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Kazan started his career as a stage actor, soon transitioning into directing. He mounted several landmark productions, including the original run of “A Streetcar Named Desire.” Throughout his career he received three Tony awards for Best Director of a Play: “All My Sons” in 1947, “Death of a Salesman” in 1949, and “J.B.” in 1959.

He transitioned into filmmaking with “A Tree Grows in Brooklyn” (1945). Two years later, he won his first Oscar for Best Director for “Gentleman’s Agreement” (1947), which also took home Best Picture and Best Supporting Actress (Celeste Holm). A taboo-shattering drama about antisemitism, the film established
See full article at Gold Derby »

'Passing for white': how a taboo film genre is being revived to expose racial privilege

Rebecca Hall’s directorial debut is an adaptation of Nella Larsen’s 1929 novel Passing, a theme little seen since the likes of Show Boat and Pinky

Hollywood once loved films about passing. The genre was popular in the 1940s and 50s, when segregation was rife and the “one-drop rule” – which deemed anybody with even a trace of African ancestry to be black – prevailed. Box-office hits included Elia Kazan’s Pinky (1949) and George Sidney’s musical Show Boat (1951), which featured light-skinned, mixed-race characters who passed for white in the hopes of enjoying the privileges whiteness confers. The secrets, the scandal and the sheer sensationalism of it all made for excellent melodrama.

Now Rebecca Hall, the star of Vicky Cristina Barcelona and Red Riding, is revisiting the genre with her directorial debut, an adaptation of Nella Larsen’s seminal 1929 novel Passing. Tessa Thompson and Ruth Negga will feature in the project, which
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Sally Field, Bill Pullman Set London Stage Debuts in ‘All My Sons’

  • Variety
Sally Field, Bill Pullman Set London Stage Debuts in ‘All My Sons’
Hollywood stars Sally Field and Bill Pullman are set to make their London stage debuts in a new production of Arthur Miller’s “All My Sons.” The pair will headline a spring 2019 production at London’s Old Vic Theatre.

Field and Pullman will star as Kate and Joe Keller, an American couple who, despite hard choices and even harder knocks, are a success story, having built a home, raised two more sons and established a thriving business. Set in 1947, the story sees the Kellers’ lives about to be shattered. With the return of a figure from the past, long-buried truths surface and the price of their American dream is laid bare.

All My Sons” is a co-production between the Old Vic and U.K. theatrical touring company Headlong. It will be directed by Headlong’s New York-born artistic director, Jeremy Herrin, marking his first production at the Old Vic. Further
See full article at Variety »

Shocking New Claim: Robert Wagner Wanted to Murder Natalie Wood’s Co-Star Warren Beatty! (Exclusive)

Aflame with jealousy, a gun-toting Robert Wagner allegedly stalked his wife Natalie Wood's Splendor in the Grass co-star Warren Beatty to his home — with the intention of committing cold-blooded murder! This eerie foreshadowing of Robert’s willingness to kill is just one of the chilling allegations to come from the third chapter of the new podcast Fatal Voyage: The Mysterious Death of Natalie Wood. “It was really driving him to a very dark place,” claimed Hollywood historian and entertainment journalist Scott Huver in an interview with Fatal Voyage. “He was prepared to kill Warren. He didn’t go through with that.” “He didn’t even confront him. He was parked outside. That shows you just how much he was falling apart because of the relationship was falling apart.” The 12-part audio documentary series, now available on iTunes, is the culmination of years of investigative reporting. It charts the rise
See full article at In Touch Weekly »
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