7.1/10
150
4 user 7 critic

Edgar G. Ulmer - The Man Off-screen (2004)

A documentary about the "King of B-Movies", Edgar G. Ulmer. It includes interviews with well-known filmmakers Roger Corman, Peter Bogdanovich, Wim Wenders, Joe Dante, and Ulmers's daughter, Arianne Ulmer.

Director:

Michael Palm

Writer:

Michael Palm

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Credited cast:
Peter Bogdanovich ... Himself
Christian Cargnelli Christian Cargnelli ... Himself
John Carradine ... (archive footage)
Robert Clarke ... (archive footage)
Roger Corman ... Himself
Joe Dante ... Himself
Margaret Field Margaret Field ... (archive footage)
Stefan Grissemann Stefan Grissemann ... Himself
Alexander Horwath Alexander Horwath ... Himself
Noah Isenberg Noah Isenberg ... Himself
Boris Karloff ... (archive footage)
Hedy Lamarr ... (archive footage)
John Landis ... Himself
Jimmy Lydon ... Himself
Gregory W. Mank Gregory W. Mank ... Himself
Edit

Storyline

A documentary about the "King of B-Movies", Edgar G. Ulmer. It includes interviews with well-known filmmakers Roger Corman, Peter Bogdanovich, Wim Wenders, Joe Dante, and Ulmers's daughter, Arianne Ulmer.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis


Edit

Details

Official Sites:

Official site | Official website

Country:

USA | Austria | Germany

Language:

English

Release Date:

4 September 2004 (Germany) See more »

Filming Locations:

Berlin, Germany See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

See full technical specs »
Edit

Did You Know?

Connections

Features The Naked Dawn (1955) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Enjoyable, but not great look at one of the movies' great, but unknown, directors
4 December 2006 | by dbborroughsSee all my reviews

Documentary portrait of the King of the B's. Ulmer worked primarily in the poverty row studios in America, after a starting in Europe in the 1920's. The work he turned out usually was looked better and played better than the rest of the films that the studios he worked for turned out. This is the man who gave us Detour (a Noir classic), The Man from Planet X (a scifi classic), Bluebeard (John Carridines best film role) and more than 50 other films that are more often than not better than they should be.

This is a portrait of the man and not so much an over view of his career. If you want to know about of his films you'll have to use this merely as a start since the amount of information contained isn't a lot.

The story is told by the people who knew him, his daughter, and the actors and actresses who worked with him; as well as those who admired him directors Wim Wenders,Roger Corman, Joe Dante and John Landis, and his biographers including Peter Bogdanovich. Its an good portrait of the man as a workaholic trying to turn out enough work for hire to get by. You also get a sense of the mystery of the man. Here's a man who may or may not have reinvented his early film career, and told Bogdanovich and others how he was simply happy making films his way, all the while trying to get back into the big studios (Ulmer appears to have been blacklisted almost at the start for running off with the wife of one of the heads of Universal Studios). The style of the film has almost everyone riding or pretending to ride in a car while being interviewed. Its done in such away as to make it look like several of the people interviewed are talking to each other, so its cut so that Dante and Landis are in the same car, talking to each other. I'm not sure the interviews were done that way but it does create some interesting imaginary conversations.

I liked the film a great deal and it caused me to bring out some of Ulmer's movies to take a look at them once again.

Worth a look for film fans and people who just want to know a bit about one of the movies unsung heroes.


7 of 7 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 4 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed